ESLpod: «Saying Goodbye» 279 – аудио и текст с переводом

Тема сегодняшнего подкаста — «Рад был с тобой повидаться».
В статье 3 аудио к тексту: для начинающих, продвинутых и транскрипт с объяснением английских терминов.

Короткое аудио позволит вам прокачать навыки аудирования, а текст к уроку будет полезным для чтения.
Можно опираться на вольный перевод подкаста, если сам текст покажется для вас сложным.

Для начинающих — медленная скорость речи.
Текст, по которому вы можете себя проверить и найти не знакомые не понятные слова — чуть ниже.
 




Разговорная скорость речи
 
 

Текст к уроку
Mina: I’d better be going. See you later.

Oliver: It might be awhile before we run into each other again.

Mina: Why is that?

Oliver: I’m going to Puerto Rico for three months starting next Tuesday. I got a job there for the summer.

Mina: I didn’t know that. That’s great! I’ve never been to Puerto Rico, but I’ve heard it’s nice. Have a good trip. It’s a shame we didn’t have more time to catch up. Is your girlfriend going with you?

Oliver: Yeah, she is. She got a job there, too, so we won’t have to be apart for three months.

Mina: That’s good. It’s too bad I won’t get to see her before you two leave. Give her my best.

Oliver: I will. Oh, I’d better get going or I’ll be late.

Mina: It was good seeing you.

Oliver: You, too. Stay in touch.

Mina: I will. Let’s get together when you get back from Puerto Rico.

Oliver: I’d like that. Bye.

Mina: Bye.

Перевод
Мина: Я лучше пойду. До скорого.

Оливер: Пройдет много времени, как мы снова пересечемся друг с другом.

Мина: Почему это?

Оливер: В следующий вторник я еду в Пуэрто-Рико на три месяца. У там нашел работу на лето.

Мина: Я этого не знала. Замечательно! Я никогда не была в Пуэрто-Рико, но я слышала, что там хорошо. Удачной поездки. Жаль, что у нас не было больше времени, чтобы пересечься. Твоя девушка едет с тобой?

Оливер: Ага. Она тоже там нашла работу, поэтому нам не придется быть в разлуке три месяца.

Мина: Это хорошо. Жаль, что я не увижу ее до того как вы уедете.Передай ей привет от меня.

Оливер: Ок, передам. Ну, все, мне лучше пойти или я опоздаю.

Мина: Рада была с тобой повидаться.

Оливер: Я тоже. Будь на связи.

Мина: Хорошо. Давайте соберемся, когда вы вернетесь из Пуэрто-Рико.

Оливер: Было бы неплохо.. До свидания.

Мина: Пока.

Транскрипт к уроку

Welcome to English as a Second Language Podcast number 279: Saying Goodbye.

This is English as a Second Language Podcast episode 279. I’m your host, Dr. Jeff McQuillan, coming to you from the Center for Educational Development in beautiful Los Angeles, California.

In this episode, we are going to learn how to say goodbye to someone that you know. Let’s get started.

[start of story]

Mina: I’d better be going. See you later.

Oliver: It might be awhile before we run into each other again.

Mina: Why is that?

Oliver: I’m going to Puerto Rico for three months starting next Tuesday. I got a job there for the summer.

Mina: I didn’t know that. That’s great! I’ve never been to Puerto Rico, but I’ve heard it’s nice. Have a good trip. It’s a shame we didn’t have more time to catch up. Is your girlfriend going with you?

Oliver: Yeah, she is. She got a job there, too, so we won’t have to be apart for three months.

Mina: That’s good. It’s too bad I won’t get to see her before you two leave. Give her my best.

Oliver: I will. Oh, I’d better get going or I’ll be late.

Mina: It was good seeing you.

Oliver: You, too. Stay in touch.

Mina: I will. Let’s get together when you get back from Puerto Rico.

Oliver: I’d like that. Bye.

Mina: Bye.

[end of story]

Our dialogue begins with Mina saying to Oliver, “I’d better be going.” The expression “I’d better be going” means “I need to go now” – “I should leave now.” It’s a way of telling the other person that you have to leave – you have to go – “Well, I’d better be going.”

“See you later,” Mina says. That’s a very common way of saying goodbye, usually somewhat informally, “See you later,” but it could be used in formal situations as well. “I will see you at a later time” is what it means.

Oliver says, “It might be awhile before we run into each other again.” “Awhile” (awhile) means a long time. “It might be awhile” – it might be a long time – “before we run into each other again.” “To run into someone,” or “to run into each other,” means to see the other person, often without expecting it, almost by accident. “I ran into my friend today at the store” – I wasn’t expecting to see her, but there she was – “I ran into her.” “To run into each other” here would mean that Oliver and Mina would see each other again.

Mina says, “Why is that,” meaning “why will it be awhile before we run into each other again.” Oliver says he’s going to Puerto Rico, which is an island that is part of the United States. Oliver says he’s going to Puerto Rico for three months starting next Tuesday. He has a job there for the summer.

Mina says, “I didn’t know that” – I didn’t know you got a job. “That’s great! I’ve never been to Puerto Rico, but I’ve heard it’s nice.” She says, “Have a good trip” meaning “have a good journey” – “have a good time in your traveling.” Mina then says, “It’s a shame we didn’t have more time to catch up.” The expression “it’s a shame” (shame) means the same as “it’s too bad.” It’s unfortunate; it’s an unhappy thing that we didn’t have more time to catch up.

The expression “to catch up” (two words) means to talk about all of the things you have done since last time you met this person. Usually, we use this expression when it has been a long time since you have seen the other person. So for example, if I have a friend and I have not seen my friend in six months, I may say, “Let’s get together for coffee to catch up” – to go over and talk about all the things that you have been doing and I have been doing, since we met last.

Mina says, “Is your girlfriend going with you” to Puerto Rico? Oliver says yes, “She got a job there, too, so we won’t have to be apart for three months.” “To be apart” (apart) means to be separated.

Mina says, “That’s good. It’s too bad I won’t get to see her before you two leave.” “It’s too bad” is similar to “it’s a shame.” It’s unfortunate – “It’s too bad I won’t get to see” your girlfriend “before you two leave.” Mina says, “Give her my best.” When you say to someone “Give her,” or him, “my best,” you mean “Say ‘hello’ to that person for me.” Tell them that I say “hello” and am thinking about them, that I remember them, perhaps.

Oliver then says, “Oh, I’d better get going or I’ll be late.” “To get going” is the same as “to be going.” “I’d better get going,” “I’d better be going” mean the same thing. Again, we use that to indicate to the other person that now I have to leave – I can’t stay here any longer.

Mina says, “It was good seeing you” – it was good to see you. “It was good seeing you.” “You, too,” Oliver says. “Stay in touch.” The expression “stay in touch” means let’s keep in contact, let’s talk to each other or email each other, or have coffee together in the future. The opposite would be to lose touch with someone. If you “lose touch,” we mean that you do not have any communication or contact with that person. Perhaps you have lost his phone number, or you don’t have someone’s address – you “lose touch.” Oliver is saying the opposite here: let’s stay in touch.

Mina says, “I will” – I will stay in touch. “Let’s get together when you get back from Puerto Rico.” “To get together” means to meet – to have a meeting for lunch or coffee, or some other reason.

Oliver says, “I’d like that,” meaning “I would like to get together with you when I get back from Puerto Rico.” “Bye.”

And Mina says, “Bye.” (Bye) bye means goodbye, a short form of goodbye.

Before we say bye, let’s listen to the dialogue again, this time at a normal speed.

[start of story]

Mina: I’d better be going. See you later.

Oliver: It might be awhile before we run into each other again.

Mina: Why is that?

Oliver: I’m going to Puerto Rico for three months starting next Tuesday. I got a job there for the summer.

Mina: I didn’t know that. That’s great! I’ve never been to Puerto Rico, but I’ve heard it’s nice. Have a good trip. It’s a shame we didn’t have more time to catch up. Is your girlfriend going with you?

Oliver: Yeah, she is. She got a job there, too, so we won’t have to be apart for three months.

Mina: That’s good. It’s too bad I won’t ge to see her before you two leave. Give her my best.

Oliver: I will. Oh, I’d better get going or I’ll be late.

Mina: It was good seeing you.

Oliver: You, too. Stay in touch.

Mina: I will. Let’s get together when you get back from Puerto Rico.

Oliver: I’d like that. Bye.

Mina: Bye.

[end of story]

The script for this podcast was written by Dr. Lucy Tse.

From Los Angeles, California, I’m Jeff McQuillan. Thanks for listening. We’ll see you next time on ESL Podcast.

English as a Second Language Podcast is written and produced by Dr. Lucy Tse, hosted by Dr. Jeff McQuillan. This podcast is copyright 2007.

Glossary

I’d better be going – a phrase meaning “I should go now,” or “I need to go now”

The kids are going to come home from school in about 20 minutes, so I’d better be going so that I can meet them there.

See you later – an informal phrase used to say goodbye, meaning that one hopes to see another person again soon

* I’m hungry, so I’m going to take my lunch break. See you later.

awhile – for a short time; for a short period of time

* Camilo was here for awhile, but then he had to go to work.

to run into (someone) – to unexpectedly meet a friend without planning it; to pass a friend on the street

* Yesterday Deng ran into his ex-girlfriend at the grocery store.

Have a good trip – a phrase used to wish someone a safe and happy trip; bon voyage

* Have a good trip, and please send us a postcard from Italy!
It’s a shame – a phrase used to show disappointment; “it’s too bad”; “that’s unfortunate”

* It’s a shame that you had to work so much when your parents were visiting last week.

to catch up – to share information with another person about what has happened since the last time the two people spoke to each other

* Kerry and Bea hadn’t seen each other in nine months, so they spent hours catching up.

apart – separated; away; not together

* Yolanda hates to be apart from her husband when she has to travel for business.

It’s too bad – a phrase used to show disappointment; “it’s a shame”; “that’s unfortunate”

* It’s too bad it’s snowing so hard. We won’t be able to take a drive into the mountains as we had planned.

to give (someone) (one’s) best – a phrase used to ask someone to say “hi” to another person; a phrase used to ask someone to express one’s best wishes to a third person

* When you see Mr. Jenkins, please give him our best.

to get going – to leave a place; to begin to leave

* Please put on your jacket and find your keys so that we can get going.

to stay in touch – to continue to communicate with someone, usually when two people are separated

* Have you stayed in touch with any of your friends from high school?

to get together – to spend time with someone socially; to go out with someone; to meet someone somewhere

* Every Thursday, our bowling team gets together for two hours to practice.

The phrase “it’s a shame,” in this podcast, is used to show disappointment: “It’s a shame that you didn’t get to see Angelina Jolie when she was in our restaurant last night.” The word “shame” usually means feelings of sadness, guilt, or embarrassment because one has done something wrong: “The boy put his head down in shame when his parents asked him why he had stolen the candy.” The phrase “shame on (someone)” means that someone should feel shame for something that he or she has done: “Shame on you for not calling your mother more often.” The phrase “to put (someone) to shame” means to make it clear that one is much better at doing something than another person is: “Maribel put her teammates to shame when she won at least 50 points in every basketball game last spring.”

*to catch up

In this podcast, the phrase “to catch up” means to share information with another person about what has happened since the last time that the two people spoke to each other: “It’s great to see you! Let’s have lunch together tomorrow so we can catch up.” The phrase “to catch up on (something)” means to spend extra time doing something because one is behind schedule: “I don’t know how I’m going to catch up on all these projects after being away for week.” The phrase “to catch up with (someone)” means to move more quickly so that one can reach a person who is further ahead: “Please start walking to the library and I’ll catch up with you as soon as I finish this phone call.”

Culture Note

In the United States, the way that people say goodbye depends on how long the “separation” (the amount of time that two people are apart) will be, and how close the relationship is.

Saying goodbye for a short separation is usually informal. For example, if you’re saying goodbye to your coworkers at the end of the workday, you might simply say “bye” as you walk past their offices. If you want to be more formal or professional, you might say goodbye by giving someone a “handshake,” where you briefly hold each other’s right hand and move your arms up and down. If you need to say goodbye to someone who is further away, you can “wave” to him or her. “To wave” is to put one’s right hand in the air with the fingers pointing up and gently move that hand in the air. To say goodbye to a very close friend or relative, you might give a hug. Americans normally do not kiss each other on the cheeks to say goodbye.

When there is going to be a longer separation, saying goodbye is more formal. Usually people take time to wish the other person a safe trip or good luck (“Have a safe trip,” or “Good luck!”). They often promise to “keep in touch” by writing or calling while they are apart.

When a coworker is leaving to accept a new job, or when a friend is moving to another city, people usually have a “going away party.” At these parties, all of the coworkers or friends of the person who is leaving get together to eat, drink, and say goodbye. The person who is leaving is usually given a card that is signed by everyone, and sometimes a nice gift, too.

Добавить комментарий

Ваш e-mail не будет опубликован. Обязательные поля помечены *